Fun photo challenges for kids

5 fun photography challenges for kids

I’ve always loved taking photos, going back to the days of basic point and shoot film cameras and the excitement of waiting weeks for the photos to be developed.

So it makes me really happy when my children get excited about photography too.

Nerys in particular is showing a real interest at the moment, so I’ve been thinking about fun activities we can do to really capture her curiosity and creativity with photography.

If you’d like to encourage your child’s interest in photography too, then here are 5 ideas for fun photography challenges you could do with them.

 

Photo scavenger hunts

This is a great idea for a photography challenge that you can either do at home or out and about in the fresh air.

All you need to do is give your child a list of items to find and then photograph.  You can keep it simple and get them to photograph each item as they find them, or you could get them to be more creative and use different angles and perspectives with each thing they find.

For older children you can use prompts that are more open-ended for things for them to find and photograph.  There are some brilliant ideas for this sort of hunt in this post from Holly Made Life – Lockdown photography treasure hunt.

If you don’t have time to come up with a list of things for your child to find, then try getting them to photograph things that start with each letter of the alphabet.  Or if that’s too many photos, try each letter of their name.

 

Photo walks

A really lovely way to enjoy photography together is to go on a photo walk with your child.

You can keep it simple and challenge them to photograph anything that they find interesting, or pretty, or that simply catches their eye.

Or you can make it a bit harder and try and find things in each colour of the rainbow to photograph.  Or things that are different shapes, or that look like letters or numbers.

 

Making rainbows

This idea from Donna at What the Redhead Said is another creative photo challenge that is great fun to do at home.

Get your child to gather as many items as they can from around the house that are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple and then arrange them in a rainbow and photograph the end result.

View this post on Instagram

Being at home for so long hasn’t come naturally to any of us but, after the first difficult week we found a routine that worked for us. We were all getting on with it. But this morning we hit a wall. The kids weren’t happy, I had run out of patience and it all just got a bit much, especially for a Monday morning. But school has set us a challenge, to create a rainbow. So we did just that. The children searched for different colour objects and toys. They helped lay them out on one of my backdrops and I took a photo of what they had created. And this was just what we needed. So bright, so colourful and a reminder of brighter days ahead. I think sometimes we need to stop, do something different, do something fun and, like I’ve said before, make new rules. If all else fails, rainbows are the answer.

A post shared by Donna – What the Redhead Said (@genuineplacebo84) on

 

Photograph shadows

If your child loves looking at things a bit differently then they’ll love this challenge.

Get them to take photos of various things, but only actually photographing their shadows.  They could photograph their own shadows, and then the whole family’s shadows.

You could make shadow puppets for them to photograph.

They can set up their toys in front of a window and photograph the shadows they each make.

Older children might really enjoy taking self portraits with shadow effects, like holding a piece of lace up to cast a patterned shadow on their face.

 

Try ‘a day in the life’

This last photograph challenge is a really lovely one to get to see your child’s perspective on the world.

Let them have access to a camera throughout the day and tell them to photograph things as they happen.  Don’t restrict them at all, just let them capture what they find interesting and worthy of photographing throughout their day.

If your child does need a bit more structure to the challenge then get them to take a photo on the hour, every hour of the day.

I do a version of this challenge each month, and I love looking back at the photos.  Even though, at the time, it can feel like the photos I’m taking are almost boring, with mundane everyday activities captured, they take on a whole new meaning and value as the years go by.

And it’ll be even more meaningful to look back at the everyday parts of life that your child captures with a project like this.

 

 

Hopefully these ideas have sparked your creativity and will get your child having even more fun with photography.

Which do you think you’ll try first?

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